Category Archives: Keeping Watch on Earth News

NO LNG Exports in Coos Bay – last day for comments

Repost from NO LNG Exports

NO LNG Exports in Coos Bay – last day for comments

Today is the last day to submit comments on dredging in Coos Bay. Check out the talking points in the link below and make sure to send in your comments about dredging to coosbaychannelmodEIS@usace.army.mil with the subject “Coos Bay Channel Modification Project EIS” before today ends.

The U.S Army Corps of Engineers is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to analyze the potential environmental effects of approving a major dredging project on the Bay. The Jordan Cove LNG Export Project proposes to widen and deepen the Coos Bay Federal Navigation for LNG Tankers. The project would be funded in part by $60 million state grant, meaning taxpayers would foot the bill for a project that would largely benefit a Canadian corporation.

Read talking points for your comments in the link here:http://www.rogueclimate.org/savethebay…

  • Submit Comments on Dredging in Coos Bay
  • Submit Comments on Dredging in Coos Bay
  • See more at ROGUECLIMATE.ORG
4
Comment
13

NO LNG Exports

on Monday

On Thursday, September 21, 2017 the Canadian Company behind the Pacific Connector gas pipeline and LNG export terminal filed their application with the federal government, marking their third attempt to build a 235 mile pipeline through southern Oregon to ship fracked gas overseas.

You can help stand up to Jordan Cove by filing as an Intervenor on the project today!

Individuals, impacted landowners, conservation organizations and community groups can file as intervenors allow

See More

OCT12

Thu 4 PMMrytle Creek LibrFriends of Myrtle Creek Library, 231 NE Division St, Myrtle Creek, OR 97457
2 people interested

 

    Phillips 66 Seeks to Increase Number of Oil Tankers on San Francisco Bay

    Repost from Earth Island Journal

    Proposal could pose risk to local communities and wildlife

    A version of this story originally appeared on the Baykeeper website.

    The oil company Phillips 66 wants to increase the number of tanker ships carrying crude oil across San Francisco Bay to its refinery in Rodeo — from 59 to 135 tankers per year. They have also proposed increasing the average amount of oil unloaded at Rodeo from 51,000 barrels to 130,000 barrels a day.

    oil tanker in san francisco bay
    Photo by Jill/Blue Moonbeam StudioAn oil tanker crosses under the Golden Gate Bridge. Phillips 66 has submitted a proposal to increase the number of oil takers that can carry oil to its bay-side refinery by more than two-fold.

    More than doubling the number of oil tankers would increase the risk of oil spills in the Bay. Oil spilled in the water can kill birds and other wildlife, make the Bay unsafe for recreation, and contaminate local beaches.

    Plus, the company’s proposal raises other concerns. The increased tanker traffic would likely carry dirty, heavy tar sands oil from Canada. This type of oil is difficult, if not impossible, to remove after a spill.

    In 2010, when tar sands oil spilled into Michigan’s Kalamazoo River, response crews were unable to completely remove the oil from the riverbed, even after five years of expensive cleanup efforts. If tar sands oil spilled in San Francisco Bay, it could harm wildlife in the water nearby and smother bottom-dwelling creatures that are critical to the Bay’s food chain.

    The Phillips 66 refinery already has a poor track record of oil spills. In September 2016, oil was spilled there during the unloading of a tanker ship, causing large oil slicks in the northern San Francisco Bay. Over 100 residents near the refinery sought treatment at hospital emergency rooms for exposure to fumes that were later linked to the oil spill.

    And then again, in September of this year, a small spill at the Phillips 66 refinery wharf left a 20 foot by 20 foot oil sheen on the Bay’s water. The impacts of small spills like this can accumulate and harm the overall health and resilience of the Bay and its wildlife.

    Phillips’ needs a modified permit from the Bay Area Air Quality District to proceed with the expansion, and the district is beginning work on an environmental impact report for the proposal. Following that process, the board of directors will vote on whether to proceed.

    In communities near the refinery, public opposition to Phillips’ expansion proposal is building. Baykeeper, a nonprofit advocating for the health of the Bay ecosystem, is working alongside community and environmental organizations to oppose any increase of oil tankers on San Francisco Bay. So far, over 24,000 Bay Area residents have responded to action alerts and told responsible agencies to reject the proposal.

    A similar coalition effort succeeded in stopping two previous proposals for expansion of Bay Area oil refining. Along with partner organizations and many concerned community members, Baykeeper stopped Valero Energy Corporation’s attempt to expand its rail yard and bring more oil by train to its Benicia refinery. That proposal would have led to a risk of oil spills and possible accidents along the Bay shoreline and in communities near railroad tracks. Our coalition also stopped a planned crude oil storage facility that was proposed by the energy infrastructure corporation WesPac for Pittsburg.

    Whether we live close to or far from a refinery, every Bay Area resident has a stake in the number of tankers carrying crude oil across the Bay. Our communities and many local businesses rely on a healthy Bay. And for wildlife that depends on the Bay, it’s a matter of life and death. By saying no to the risk of more oil spills on San Francisco Bay, we can make sure this place we call home is protected for future generations.

      Zoning Out Fossil Fuels: Local Action for A Better Future

      Repost from STAND.earth  (See far below for webcast)

      #ClimateIsLocal

      Every environmental attack by the Trump Administration further emphasizes the importance of taking local action on climate. Climate inaction at the federal level isn’t new–and neither is real success on climate action at the local level.
       
      Hidden by the barrage of bad news stories about hurricanes, wildfires, and international climate agreements, are dozens of good news stories about frontline communities defeating dirty fuel projects and municipalities leading the way on zoning out new fossil fuel infrastructure. 
       
      Towns and counties have local land use powers that allow them to change regulations to prevent the siting of new fossil fuel infrastructure. Around the US, activists and NGOs have been working with these city and county governments to effectively “zone out” the ability to permit new dirty fuel projects. 
       
      A few of the examples:

      • In Whatcom County, Washington, the County Council will hold a public hearing on 9/26/17 and vote to pass an extension of the moratorium on accepting applications for new infrastructure that could be used for unrefined fossil fuel export. This will eventually become codified in the county’s land use policy.
      • In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the board of Harbor Commissioners and Public Works department, operating under the City of Milwaukee, amended a lease to not allow US Oil to “receive, handle, store, ship or otherwise process or distribute crude oil” at the port.
      • In Tacoma, Washington, a permitting freeze similar to Whatcom’s is close to passage, with plans to alter the port’s industrial zoning to prevent new dirty fuel projects.
      • In Portland, Oregon, an ordinance was passed to prevent the siting of bulk crude storage in the city. The legal challenge from industry is winding through the courts, but the ordinance has a good chance of being upheld.

      If implemented broadly, passing municipal land use ordinances can prevent the growth of the fossil fuel economy, and be a critical element in fighting global warming, regardless of what the Trump Administration tries to do.

      We hosted a recent webcast with activists from the efforts in Whatcom County, WA and Portland, OR.

      Want the local resources mentioned in the webcast? STAND.earth has got you covered. Click here.